October 30, 2014

New Features Links

From time to time, questions are raised as to what new features have been added between Release X and Release Y. I try write about the new features at the time of each release (or, at the least, the new features that interest me), but have never collected links to all of those in one place. To make it easier for me to refer to them, and for others to find them, this post will become an index to the new features posts. I will place a link to it under the Oldies But Goodies section at the right side of the blog.

ACA 2016
ACA 2016: Quick Notes
ACA/AMEP 2016: Styles Browser Part 1
ACA/AMEP 2016: Styles Browser Part 2
ACA/AMEP 2016: Section Enhancements
ACA/AMEP 2016: Property Visibility Override

ACA 2015
ACA 2015 - New Look
ACA 2015 - Style Import
ACA 2015 - Version Management in Project Navigator
ACA 2015 - Visual Comparison
ACA 2015 - Command Preview
AutoCAD 2015 - Cursor Badges
ACA 2015 - Highlighting and Selection Preview

ACA 2014
ACA 2014: Property Set Defintion Auto-attach
ACA 2014: Command Line Search
ACA 2014: Door and Window Placement
ACA 2014: Tools from the DACH Extension
ACA 2014: Additional New Features/Improvements

ACA 2013
ACA 2013 - Grouping and Subtotals in Schedule Tables
ACA 2013: Object Display Enhancements Part 1
ACA 2013: Object Display Enhancements Part 2
ACA 2013: Object Display Enhancements Part 3
AutoCAD 2013 - Command Line Enhancements

ACA 2012
ACA 2012 New Feature - Corner Windows
ACA 2012 Enhanced Feature - Column Grids
AutoCAD 2012 New Feature - In-Canvas View Controls
AutoCAD 2012 New Feature - AutoComplete

ACA 2011
AutoCAD® Architecture 2011 Overview
Selection Cycling
ACA 2011 - Opening Location Changes - Part 1
ACA 2011 - Opening Location Changes - Part 2
ACA 2011 - Opening Location Changes - Part 3
ACA 2011 - Opening Location Changes - Part 4

ACA 2010
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - Editing Wall Cleanup In Place
More AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 Features
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 1 - The Application Menu
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 – UI Changes, Part 2 – Resizing the Ribbon
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 3 - The Ribbon, Home Tab
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 3.5 - Tool Palette Command Buttons Alert
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 3.6 - Fixing Context Menu Paste Commands
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 – UI Changes, Part 4 – The Ribbon, Insert Tab
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 – UI Changes, Part 4.5 – Ribbon Tools
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 – UI Changes, Part 5 – The Ribbon, Annotate Tab
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 – UI Changes, Part 6 – The Ribbon, Render Tab
2010 File Format Change
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 7 - The Ribbon, View Tab
AutoCAD® Architecture 2010 - UI Changes, Part 8 - The Ribbon, Manage Tab

ACA 2009
AutoCAD Architecture 2009 - Part 1
AutoCAD Architecture 2009 - Part 2
AutoCAD Architecture 2009 - Part 3
AutoCAD Architecture 2009 - Part 4
Space Generation in ACD-A 2009 with AutoCAD® Object Boundaries

ACA 2008
No More LTSCALE/PSLTSCALE Problems!
Annotative Tags With Leaders in ACA 2008
I appear to have been distracted in 2007, and did not write extensively about the new features in ACA 2008. You can read about three 2008 features that were at the top of Matt Dillon's list in his blog, here.

ADT 2007
ADT 2006 Tags
Enhanced Property Data Features in ADT 2007, Part 1
Enhanced Property Data Features in ADT 2007, Part 2
Enhanced Property Data Features in ADT 2007, Part 3
Enhanced Property Data Features in ADT 2007, Part 4
Enhanced Property Data Features in ADT 2007, Part 5
ACA 2008/ADT 2007: Setting a Different Property Data Format in a Formula Property

ADT 2006
ADT 2006 Tags
ADT 2006 Tags Illustrated
Formula Property Interface Improved in ADT 2006
Selection Previewing in ADT/AutoCAD 2006
Selection Previewing Update

October 18, 2014

Renaissance Revit - A Partial Review

Some time ago, I purchased Renaissance Revit® - Creating Classical Architecture with Modern Software, by Paul F. Aubin. Since then, I have been struggling with finding time to work my way through the tutorials in the book. Having finally made it into Chapter 6 (of 14), and completed the Tuscan column, it occurred to me that I should write something about it now, rather than waiting until I had gotten through the entire book (whenever that may be).

The intent of the book is to provide intermediate and advanced lessons in the use of the Revit Family Editor. The vehicle in which these lessons is delivered is classical architecture, but whether or not your design work involves use of the classical orders, all but the most highly experienced Family Editor users will find numerous techniques and tips that will be quite useful in the families that you create for your work. The book assumes a basic understanding of Revit. Chapter 2 provides an overview of basic family editor skills for anyone new to the Family Editor.

The book starts out by laying a foundation of skills needed throughout the rest of the book. A brief discussion of the classical orders and the strategies that will be used is followed by a review of core Family Editor skills. Since the classical orders are all based on scale and proportion, and because the SCALE command in Revit does not work on many elements, including 3D geometry, Chapter 3 introduces methods for enabling scaling and maintaining proportions through parameters. Anyone who has ever struggled with parametrically controlling curves and/or angles in a family (which includes me) will find Chapter 4, which covers constraining curves, well worth the cost of the book.

Chapters 5 and 6 apply the lessons learned to the creation of content for the Tuscan Order. All of the content is tied back to the diameter at the base of the column by formulas, and, for the columns, the base diameter is determined by the column height. One family, with just two types (Without Pedstal and With Pedestal), produces columns of any size, scaled up or down based on the column height.

The Screencast below shows the Tuscan column in action.

I have no hesitation in highly recommending this book to anyone seeking to improve their knowledge of the Revit Family Editor, particularly those who have made some basic families and are looking to learn more advanced techniques. If you can afford the higher cost, the color edition enhances the learning experience. But if cost is an issue, the content in the black and white version is the same. Instructions for downloading a dataset from the author's website are provided. You can download either just the files needed to start each lesson, or a larger package that also includes catch-up and completed files. The catch-up files let you jump in at intermediate points in a lesson, if desired (or can be used to compare against your file, to see if you executed the tutorial up to that point correctly).

FULL DISCLOSURE: I know the author and have worked with him in a paid capacity on other books (the 2010 and 2011 editions of his book for AutoCAD® Architecture). I did not have anything to do with the production of this book (other than responding to a survey that Mr. Aubin conducted) and paid the full retail price for my copy of the book.